Is jMonkeyEngine right for me?

Hey everyone,

So I just went through a 8 week Intermediate Java programming class and now I feel that I have a good solid knowledge of the basics of Java. However there is nothing that I wish to design with Java other then a game. I want to make a Runescape Classic remake that integrates other key features of other games. This has been my goal for about 8 years and I am getting closer. I have been doing some research and it appears this is one, if not the best, Java game engines. But I will list the features I am after:

I am looking for:
Browser Based
Multiplayer
MMORPG
Medieval Type
Not ported to Android or iOS as it will be to complicated on mobile

Just curious if anyone agrees this is the GE to use or if there is something better for my needs.

Yes, JME would be fine for that.

Very respectfully, I suggest you start with two or three simpler projects first. 8 weeks of basic Java is not nearly enough to write a multiplayer game successfully. I’d be very surprised if you could even complete a simple single player game without a lot more learning… and a multiplayer game is easily 10 to 20 times harder.

I suggest you start smaller and work your way up. As a benchmark, I usually say that someone with the skill to write a game could easily write a simple text adventure in a few hours or an asteroids clone over a weekend or so. These are both simple first tries and the skills and structure learned are 100% transferable. It may take you weeks or months to accomplish those but then think of how long it would have taken to write an MMO. People who could put together Asteroids in a weekend take years to write an MMO.

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Ok great. I prefer to stick with Java since I already know basics and from here out is just improving instead of making a whole new game. Do you know of any examples of MMORPG that have been created with jMonkey?

And the MMORPG is the long term goal. I would start with smaller games and work from there.

@fishzilla said: Ok great. I prefer to stick with Java since I already know basics and from here out is just improving instead of making a whole new game. Do you know of any examples of MMORPG that have been created with jMonkey?

And the MMORPG is the long term goal. I would start with smaller games and work from there.

I don’t think anyone has ever completed an MMORPG with JME. It’s about the most complicated game (or software) project one can undertake, really.

Does jMonkey allow MMORPG?

@fishzilla said: Does jMonkey allow MMORPG?
@pspeed said: Yes, JME would be fine for that.

But it will not do the hard work for you… and many many (MANY) WAY more experienced folks have tried and still not finished. And that’s not just a JME phenomenon… it’s universally true. It is one of the hardest types of software to write. Do not underestimate it’s complexity.

Do a year’s worth of simpler more reachable projects and then see if you still want to make one.

Been a while since this has been posted ^_^:

I don’t wanna discourage you, but being realistic, you would need years of experience to pull this off successfully, and then many years to complete it. If you are working on it 12 hours a day, in some basement, then maybe it can be done sooner. It’s also not just about java programming, you’ll need sounds, art, models, careful design, networking skills, UI, masses of testing, marketing and advertising etc. And learning all of these at once, is just going to be 1 big pain in the ass. Better you take it 1 step at a time, as @pspeed suggested. Start simple, solidify your knowledge of each area with simple games demonstrating them, until you fully understand what you are doing.

Otherwise is will be a hair-pulling, head-banging, shitty experience in which you’ll want to kill yourself, and the results will most likely be poor.

Also read this:
http://www.gamedev.net/blog/355/entry-2250155-why-you-shouldnt-be-making-an-mmo/

Good luck

Ok, any idea of how I should start learning? I don’t ever know what kind of programs to make so I don’t know what to do. Should I just stick with Android games?

Start here:

https://wiki.jmonkeyengine.org/legacy/doku.php/jme3

and read everything (pretty much).

Make sure your math is up to scratch.

You can make what ever you want, just don’t over-complicate it. Don’t do android yet, just mess around on your desktop.

Hmm, so I will forget the dreams of a MMORPG. I just don’t see the point of making games that only I can play by myself so I think I will look into Android games after I get through jMonkey.

Plan is to practice making small games while learning the game engine. Then once I have a decent bit of knowledge I will make Android apps. I am wanting to make a profit out of this, thats why I had originally went for the MMORPG route.

Why does not doing an MMO imply that only you can play the game? Theres even text based games many people play…? And btw, RPG style games don’t go well on Steam Greenlight for example. I guess because people know that doing this type of game well requires some resources. Indie games have a way better stand with smaller-scale games with “special” gameplay that no other games offer.

@normen said: Indie games have a way better stand with smaller-scale games with "special" gameplay that no other games offer.

This sounds interesting, but I’m not following. What do you mean by this? Anything that is a positive in the way of indie games is of interest, of course… would you be able to give a quick example of special game play? I think that developing a game is much easier than developing a game that is actually fun to play and any hints as to what make someone take interest in an indie game would be ultra helpful =)

@t0neg0d said: This sounds interesting, but I'm not following. What do you mean by this? Anything that is a positive in the way of indie games is of interest, of course... would you be able to give a quick example of *special* game play? I think that developing a game is much easier than developing a game that is actually fun to play and any hints as to what make someone take interest in an indie game would be ultra helpful =)

Well gameplay or content that nobody else has because it only attracts a small user base for example. Take any Greenlight game really. “Chivalry” is a “swing your sword where it should hurt” game and afaik about the only one. “Passport Please” (?) lets you check peoples passports with 8-bit style graphics (yeah, thats the gameplay). The infamous “Farming Simulator” or “Truck Driver Simulator” games have huge userbases despite being not exactly AAA games. Theres a game that lets you play Paintball, basically a simple shooter but many Paintball fans play it. All of these definitely don’t appeal to the larger part of gamers but certainly can attract a nice user base.

If you do a game type that is already covered by the main studios (MMO, FPS, “Cinematic”, RTS etc.) then you need to have more models, larger levels and better sound and graphics than them to compete… Hardly possible.

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@normen said: Well gameplay or content that nobody else has because it only attracts a small user base for example. Take any Greenlight game really. "Chivalry" is a "swing your sword where it should hurt" game and afaik about the only one. "Passport Please" (?) lets you check peoples passports with 8-bit style graphics (yeah, thats the gameplay). The infamous "Farming Simulator" or "Truck Driver Simulator" games have huge userbases despite being not exactly AAA games. Theres a game that lets you play Paintball, basically a simple shooter but many Paintball fans play it. All of these definitely don't appeal to the larger part of gamers but certainly can attract a nice user base.

If you do a game type that is already covered by the main studios (MMO, FPS, “Cinematic”, RTS etc.) then you need to have more models, larger levels and better sound and graphics than them to compete… Hardly possible.

Awesome summary! Thank you!!

@fishzilla said: Hmm, so I will forget the dreams of a MMORPG.

Not necessarily; the worst complications come from the real-time aspect.
Make a turn-based game, and they will go away.

I’d still recommend doing something single-player first.
The point will come when you want to rewrite the code from scratch because “OMFG it has grown soo awful”, and that’s the moment when you can add the turn-based networking stuff.

Even turn based networking is still hard. Not as bad as real-time I still agree but it’s not an easy subject.