Which Tutorial do YOU want?

I sometimes have a spare cycles and want to contribute something back to the project: I'd like to update existing jME tutorials, or even write new ones.



I'm looking at forum questions and the wiki to determine where documentation is needed most urgently. Many things are actually already there, but the tutorial may not yet use the latest features, or the sample code is still for jME 1.0, or it's hard to find, and we are still regularly haunted by nightmares of the Unspecified LWJGL Link, etc… I'm not an expert (yet), :wink: I still see the framework through the eyes of a beginner, so I also plan to streamline the existing info better for newbies.



Well, feel free to send me a PM with comments or ideas. (I don't know how touchy people are about me editing their wiki pages.)



If you can think of topics that you would like to see updated first, please leave a reply, so I can get a picture of what is needed. Thanks! (I'll be back in the forum on Sunday.)

I was thinking about making this one later, but maybe you could.  Write a tutorial about making an Applet with JME using the new SimpleApplet and such.  This would include packaging and signing jars, and distributing with LWJGL AppletLoader http://lwjgl.org/wiki/doku.php/lwjgl/tutorials/applet.  Maybe also how to debug a remote applet in the browser from eclipse.

I would like the FlagRush tutorials to be updated with the latest build of jME 2.

@roslamir: What doesn't work with the Flag Rush tutorial with the latest build? I ran lesson 9 with 2.0.1 (using the TestChooser) and didn't notice anything off. Or do you mean continuing the tutorial?

Speaking of the TestChooser, it would be nice to have a script again to build and run the TestChooser without an IDE… I'll investigate.



@SomethingNew: A tutorial about signing of applets (and, web start apps, for that matter) including all the libraries would be very useful indeed. Problem is I don't know how to do that myself. I'll keep it in mind, but it will not be the first thing I do.



In any case I'll go through the wiki and see what we already have, and what I can update to 2.0.1.



PS:



One question to all: Does anybody still use jME 1.0 or 2.0, should code samples be archived? If nobody is using these versions, it would be easier to just remove old examples. But there may be projects depending on it that have not migrated yet…

zathras said:

One question to all: Does anybody still use jME 1.0 or 2.0, should code samples be archived? If nobody is using these versions, it would be easier to just remove old examples. But there may be projects depending on it that have not migrated yet...

I'm still using jME 1.0, but I don't need any code-samples or tutorials.
SomethingNew said:

... Write a tutorial about making an Applet with JME using the new SimpleApplet and such.  This would include packaging and signing jars, and distributing with LWJGL AppletLoader http://lwjgl.org/wiki/doku.php/lwjgl/tutorials/applet.  Maybe also how to debug a remote applet in the browser from eclipse.


For applets there is: http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=writing_a_jme_applet.

For WebStart and more information on jar signing: http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=jme_webstart_step_by_step

I don't exactly remember but the last time I was working with the tutorials I had a lot of problem with it.



Maybe the tutorial source code in the latest build is up to date but the write-up on the tutorial page was not in sync with the latest source code.



Roslan

The flag rush tutorials on "All the Effects You Could Want" / "But… I Want to Hear Them Die!" (sound?) and "Menu System and System Properties" are not there.



I wanted to read them today while "waiting for my code to compile"



Then I saw this thread …

+1  for FlagRush Tutorials.  :wink:








Well, The new Frontpage seems like a nice Project to me,

and currently i'm trying to refactor code from jME 1 -> jME 2 (latest SVN),

but i'm doing this not very fast (about one or two pages in a week…)



I'm not doing the flagrush, cause that would mean to code and i'm quite busy with coding already.



Keep up your work, documentation is really one of the most important "features" jME misses!

I see that as you! Actually we already have some of the "getting started"-tutorials ported to jME2.

And in my oppinion that should be a quite good start. The flagrush-tutorial in SVN is enough as it is.

Very much comments and the rest have to be found out be everyone themselfs. That is part of the

learning-process as well. (In my oppinion there is nothing more important for learning the engine

than solving problems by reading the code)

Hello everybody, I'm new to jMonkeyEngine, but have been working with java for 8 years. One of the functions I have at my job is to write technical manuals for programmers. For reasons that are too long to explain now, I'm about to start the "adventure"    :slight_smile: (for lack of a better word) to write a little "jMonkey for Dummies" document, in both english and spanish.



If luck is on my side, that document will help at least the "newbies". I already wrote the first chapter (with just theory of videogames).



So, my question is… is there anybody responsible for the jMonkey documentation? any email I should write to? any coordinator?



I don't want to bother anyone, I'll do my stuff on my own time, I just want to know if there is someone in the jMonkey team I can send my document so I can get at least a "you are going in the right way" kind of comment. I'm also looking for the best place to put that document in the jMonkeyForum so anybody can also take a look at it and provide me any feedback.



bye!



Henry

Thanks Henry, we can need all the help we can get! Do you have a wiki link to your first chapter? I'm looking forward to reading it. ttrocha already did a good job updating the Starter Tutorials to jme2, thanks! (I also updated one or two of them.)



On the new frontpage, people can start with the (now updated) Starter tutorial, then continue with the FlagRush tutorial. They first learn the basics, how do I load a model and add it to the rootNode, how do I navigate and respond to a click. 



Next there are intermediate topics, such as really understanding the structure of SimpleGame and StandardGame, and how to learn from the "Tests" in the jmetest directory.



Next, there are various advanced topics (animation, audio, transparency, materials, GUIs, effects, applets…), but those documents will not likely be part of a tutorial series. At this point, your game will be so customized that a tutorial will not be able to provide you with anything but general tips anyway…



Does this structure make sense to you guys?

http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/wiki/doku.php/api_feature_mapping



Well, I wrote something else first. :wink:



I made a table that maps "typical game features" to "jME classes", and also to existing tutorials that contain a usage example that gets you started quickly.



For example, you say "How, oh, how do I stick the player score as text to the edge of the screen?!" Then you look it up and it suggests you should go through this HUD tutorial and read up on BlendState and QUEUE_ORTHO. Happy end.



Have a look and tell me whether it's useful. Of course you can extend it, this is only a small start. If you can think of a tutorial that totally helped you get the hang of something, why not share this tip here?

Hi,



I went through the tutorials given in the wiki and they were quite helpful already. What I missed, though, is a sort of a thread throughout the tutorials. Previously I played around with the GTGE engine for 2D games and the tutorial there starts with the very simple task of just drawing something. The tutorials build on one another resulting in one simple but complete game. So basically you start at the bottom and add up complexity and refactor.



I would very much appreciate a similar approach in tutorials here as it helps to understand more, not only what part of the engine you need to achieve certain things, you also get a feel of what to do first and how to proceed to the more complex stuff.

True. The current set of tutorials was contributed by some people, updated by other people, and then added to the wiki homepage by other people. Obviously that results in a lack of coherence.



But we at least sorted the starters tutorials in a way so that each step is more complex, and they are also linked to each other in a useful order. At the same time, each starter tutorial stands on its own, so a beginner is not forced to complete 10 of them only to understand the 11th – that is on purpose.


The tutorials build on one another resulting in one simple but complete game. So basically you start at the bottom and add up complexity and refactor.


Like this? http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=flag_rush_tutorial_series_by_mojomonkey
Unfortunately the original contributor never completed it, so the last few steps are missing (and apart from the chapter titles, I don't know what he wanted to write.)

Since there is interest, I will fill in some of the later chapters. I actually started doing that a while ago and forgot about it. ;)

(And for JME3, we will need new documentation anyway, I plan to write a new Flag Rush Series.)

zathras, thanks for your response, this is exactly what I am talking about. It sure is a good thing that there are tutorials where you don't need to go through a 100 pages to just find what you need. For me, however, it's sometimes hard to know how stuff needs to be done if I don't get to understand the basics beneath, so to me a continuous tutorial walking me from "paint a freaken box in a dark place" to "have shiny explosions caused by your particle enhanced rockets coming out of your 3ds max model ship with cool stuff coming out of your engine, a cam chasing the action while intelligent enemies try to bring you down" would be the thing to go for. There is just (obviously, doh!) so much stuff to figure out for someone new to 3D game creation. And more often than not, it's the little things that kill.



I also peeked into other parts of the forum and saw a GDE in development, which I really think is awesome! Such an environment would make it much easier to create the scene stuff, even for people who do it just for kicks, like me. Overall I really want to stress that I think for what I've tried jMonkey is the engine to go for in terms of moderate learning curve. Still, it is a 3D game creation learning curve. :wink:

Psst. Video tutorials.

Code being written and explained on the same time: double win.

I don't mind reading and learning from raw code(really I don't) but everything is progressed so much faster through a video! At least in my opinion.


  • Mikkel

video tut isnt a bad idea, but it must be clear (at least clear enough so the eyes of viewers wont hurt  :-o)

source code should be clearly explained and should also be there to download



about source code, I wonder which one it should be

1, the whole source code of a completed game like flagrush, then operate it into small pieces and explain them

2, show the small pieces then make a whole game from them (like lego)



scene graph

creating a box, meeting vector3f, what does min, max in new Box("the box",min,max);  mean and so on

place it to somewhere, rotate,scale it,  (how?)

load object, its animation  (what kind of object jme supports? ogre,obj,dae…) what is the advantage and dis.

                                            how to load animation, which types, ad/dis and so on

collision

camera view (location,rotate up,down,left,right)

effects

terrain

and of course a lot of other things, which I dont even know about ^^



and it should contain more pictures, so that beginners can easier understand.



personally and at this moment I need tuts about collision,camera view and animation ^^

hopefully can someone write them in second way with speed of light, so that i can attack them immediately  :smiley:




The tricky thing about video tutorials is that they can only be made for the far most general stuff. This is to ensure that the tutorial is not immediately outdated, effectively deprecating hours of work. Any video tutorial made by the jMonkey team (that includes Zathras now) will probably have to wait for v3.0, since that's what we want to gradually shift users' focus to in the coming months. Until at least beta, it won't really be safe to make video tutorials for jME3.



As for traditional wiki docs though, 2.0 still receives a lot of attention and any suggestions are most appreciated. So thanks, xieu90.