USE the SDK (MINI RANT)

K soooo, some of these problems on here with people trying to get JME to work in Netbeans/Eclipse/whatever



The SDK IS Netbeans… so either i’m terribly mistaken, or trying to get JME to work in netbeans reaps more problems then rewards



I guess you could claim you like eclipse or another IDE better, i dunno, i used both, and I don’t see a huge difference, i still think you’d be better off just using the SDK



Thoughts?



EDIT: The title of the thread was more for shock value to get you to look and join in on the discussion

I don’t really get your point, are you unhappy to use the SDK, or are you unhappy some people don’t?

K soooo, some of these problems on here with people trying to get JME to work in Windows/Mac/whatever



The original operating system is Unix.

when I say i use linux now for some while on my laptop and it is superior in all aspects to the windows that was installed before. (Performance, security, moddability,cost).



How would you feel now if I say I think you would be better of just using a linux OS?





(Guess you understand my point don’t you? (note no os war wanted here, different people just like different stuff, thats all)

@nehon said:
I don't really get your point,


It was a rant, so i don't necessarily need a point...

My point is that the SDK is built on netbeans, if you are trying to get JME to work on netbeans you should just use the SDK, (I included that personally i don't think there are enough differences between IDEs to really make it worth doing anything other than the SDK, but that is of course personal preference)

@nehon said:
are you unhappy to use the SDK


No, not at all, the SDK is great, install it, its all there ready to go, (no linking libraries/setting up asset paths/ etc.)

I remember trying to setup JME2 in netbeans, getting all the lwjgl libraries and stuff, it was a real pain

@kbender88 ohh ok, was just an understanding problem. Actually I completely agree…the SDK is really helping (though I’m kinda biased :D)

That said…let people do what they want…you’ll get nothing but flames from a post like this, that a waste of time.

Things like this explain why I use the SDK :slight_smile:



While to tempting, I will say lets just stop this, before my flaming I try to write instead of this breaks loose. Let people their freedom and dont go fanatic about one thing, just because you think it’s good. Tell people that you like it and why if they ask, dont try to shove it into anyone not wanting to listen at all.!

No there’s no need for flaming, this wasn’t meant to insult anyone



do you use something other than the SDK?



are there helpful advantages that maybe i/others are overlooking?

I made an update to the topic, i see the title was a bit misleading but it was just to get people to look, and in turn generate some discussion

1 Like

Actually yes, I use eclipse. The SDK is not remotly compatible with the project settings I use.

→ Server uses a 64bit scenegraph with a native bullet binding derived from the jme3 one.

→ Client gets object positions in relation to their parent with double percision.

→ Client calcualtes offsets ina way that the camera is always in the center to circumvent float precision issues.

→ the last point makes using the SDK mostly impossible as it was simply not designed to be used like this.

1 Like

Hmm good point



I could see how with a unique set of requirements it would force you to be more flexible, and it would make more sense to setup your own dev enviroment in something else…



So really i would revise my statement “If you are going to use something other than the SDK, make sure you have a good reason” Otherwise you are just going to introduce problems that you would have otherwise avoided…

@EmpirePhoenix said:
Actually yes, I use eclipse. The SDK is not remotly compatible with the project settings I use.
-> Server uses a 64bit scenegraph with a native bullet binding derived from the jme3 one.
-> Client gets object positions in relation to their parent with double percision.
-> Client calcualtes offsets ina way that the camera is always in the center to circumvent float precision issues.
-> the last point makes using the SDK mostly impossible as it was simply not designed to be used like this.

What a load of bullcrap. You can use the SDK for all of this. As @kbender88 said, its just an IDE, you can modify jme any way you want with it and it doesn't force you to use the engine in any way. You still load models don't you? And you still need to modify their materials don't you? You also still might need some fonts for your game or deploy it as an exe or edit shader code or preview nifty files or combine models or edit terrain or... you get it.. You can even make plugins very quickly for your "custom needs" with all the infrastructure to access files, geometry assetmanager etc. in place.
1 Like

I use Eclipse as well, but mainly because it’s more stable on my system for some reason, I use it for my other programming needs so I’m more comfortable with the interface and short cuts in Eclipse than I am with NB and because the others in my jME-project team also use it. I still occasionally use the SDK for some things though, as some of the tools provided in it are extremely useful and perhaps we’ll switch to it for jME work some day when we’re feeling adventurous. :wink:

If you’re just starting with jME and you haven’t used an IDE before, I’d say use the SDK, as it’ll be easier for you.

I use eclipse, for some reasons:



a.) I find netbeans to … well, it has to many things in it’s UI that i myself find annoying. I simply don’t like it and i consider the way eclipse does it with SWT/JFace far better.



b.) I used eclipse long before i used JME. So my whole workspace is set up using eclipse. Why would i switch?



c.) I sometimes work with other languages. Eclipse supports all languages i work with in (almost) every way i need it. Why would i use a different IDE just for one framework in one language, when i do all my other work in eclipse. I have far greater knowledge of eclipse, and getting used to netbeans is just a waste of time.



d.) i can use many of the benefits the SDK anyway. E.g.: Nothing prevents me from using the terrain editor, export all the stuff and put it into my eclipse project.



e.) So, after considering b,c and d.) i don’t see any benefit using the SDK, especially when a.) is not likely to change any time soon.

1 Like

I remember this argument back in the 90s when it was Emacs versus vi. :wink:



Everyone should use whatever they find the most productive. The wiser (older?) developers won’t mind using many tools to get the job done if it makes their life a little easier… a few generations of IDE switch over leads to more flexibility in some ways (less in others). I cut my teeth on vi, emacs, and text-based MS PWB (programmer’s workbench). So much of this feels like arguing over whether a Ferrari, a Lexus, or a Lamborghini is better for making trips to the hardware store.



Anyway, the complaints/issues that bother me most are the users who clearly don’t know eclipse well at all but for some reason still want to use it instead of the SDK. “I’m a total noob but I still want to do things the harder way for no good reason.” And so on.

3 Likes
@pspeed said:
Anyway, the complaints/issues that bother me most are the users who clearly don't know eclipse well at all but for some reason still want to use it instead of the SDK. "I'm a total noob but I still want to do things the harder way for no good reason." And so on.


And that is exactly my point... and then its "JME is BROKEN OMG... someone help me get my material on my model NOW"
@EmpirePhoenix said:
Actually yes, I use eclipse. The SDK is not remotly compatible with the project settings I use.

@normen said:
What a load of bullcrap.

lol, I too am curious how JMP imposes these limitations on you. The engine is the same either way, so I don't see how the IDE would interfere with your ability to do the things you want to do with precision.
@polygnome said:
I use eclipse, for some reasons:
a.) I find netbeans to ... well, it has to many things in it's UI that i myself find annoying. I simply don't like it and i consider the way eclipse does it with SWT/JFace far better.
b.) I used eclipse long before i used JME. So my whole workspace is set up using eclipse. Why would i switch?
c.) I sometimes work with other languages. Eclipse supports all languages i work with in (almost) every way i need it. Why would i use a different IDE just for one framework in one language, when i do all my other work in eclipse. I have far greater knowledge of eclipse, and getting used to netbeans is just a waste of time.
d.) i can use many of the benefits the SDK anyway. E.g.: Nothing prevents me from using the terrain editor, export all the stuff and put it into my eclipse project.
e.) So, after considering b,c and d.) i don't see any benefit using the SDK, especially when a.) is not likely to change any time soon.

a) The only argument ever
b) Because you do something completely different with a completely different workspace anyway. I use eclipse for GWT for example. Why would I want all my game development tools cluttering my IDE when I code GWT apps? How does my Eclipse/GWT knowledge help me when coding a game?
c) answer is in b) also NetBeans supports other languages just as well and if its something external thats compatible with jME we'll most probably also prepare the integration with the SDK, so no need for any "IDE knowledge" anyway.
d) I even prepared it so that you can use them concurrently, with an eclipse project. Still people whine about they want the stuff to be redone in eclipse every once in a while (got better though).
e) Using a native windowing environment for java thats not even very compatible across platforms, proprietary, closed-source and not very java-ish in general as the main argument doesn't sound like a good argument from a java programmer :P

Eclipse also crashes and bugs on me all the time like virtually every software on this planet when you really use it so don't tell me NetBeans sucks so much or cannot compete. I completely agree everybody should use the IDE that he sees fit best but eclipse fanboys have to admit its only because of the GUI. ;P
@normen said:I completely agree everybody should use the IDE that he sees fit best but eclipse fanboys have to admit its only because of the GUI. ;P

Yes, I prefer eclipse and yes it's because of the GUI differences. But then again the GUI is the only real difference; they can both do mostly the same things.

How can you say that a java program not being "very java-ish" is a bad thing? I don't like when java GUIs look so stereotypically 'java' that you know it's java at first glance. If anything it shows off the power of java to people who otherwise believe the "java-look" is all that can come out of java.

Also, to combat your anecdotal evidence with my own anecdotal evidence, I have not had any issues running eclipse on any platform and it does perform much "smoother" than NetBeans.

Installing/using plugins for eclipse has never made sense to me, though. I don't use it for any language except java. I'm not against learning something new; not for languages and not for IDEs. So I'm fine using JMP, and the plugin system is great.
@polygnome said:
d.) i can use many of the benefits the SDK anyway. E.g.: Nothing prevents me from using the terrain editor, export all the stuff and put it into my eclipse project.

d.) i don't see any benefit using the SDK, especially when a.) is not likely to change any time soon.


This is a contradition ;).